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Movie Review: Stephen King’s “It”

Roman Browning, Entertainment Co-Editor

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Edit: This review contains a *SPOILER ALERT*. If you have not seen the film and don’t want it to be ruined, stop reading now! 

Tomatometer- 86%

Audience Score- 89%

In the town of Derry, a evil entity, known as IT, has been hunting and killing children for hundreds of years. Appearing every twenty-seven years, IT comes back in the summer of 1989. A group of kids known as “The Losers’ Club” come together because of being rejected by society for their own individual quirks. Together they learn the truth about Pennywise (IT) and face off against their own fears and Henry Bowers, the school bully.

This film does an amazing job of focusing on the children’s individual fears while leading the plot to a climax in a interesting and intense way. But what makes this film so different from other horror movies are the intricate subplots that the characters give. This puts the flick on a whole new level.

The undeclared leader of “The Losers’ Club”, Bill (Jaeden Lieberher), faces his fear of accepting Georgie’s (Jackson Scott) death. Throughout the film, Bill keeps his hopes up that his little brother could still be alive, and Pennywise uses this against him. We see this character complete his heroic cycle journey at the end of the film where Bill faces reality and knows Georgie is gone.

Our next character is Beverly Marsh (Sophia Lillis). Beverly or “Bev” is another big “team player” that helps the boys along while dealing with a dark home life. Throughout the film we see her hold on to hope for true love with her secret admirer. She believes that her secret admirer is Bill, but in actuality, Ben (Jeremy Ray Taylor), is the true culprit. This love triangle adds a subplot in the film that makes you think back to your “first love”, and how complicated and awkward teenage love is.

Ben, the last side of the triangle, is the definition of a “middle-schooler” in the film. We feel the awkwardness he has when talking to Bev (just like most of us do when talking to our significant other) and his love for The Backstreet Boys makes us relate to him even more. You remember that one band you loved that no one else did, but nobody could know about. Ben’s intelligence and insight to the group is also pivotal to their success in finding out just what IT is.

The Stranger Things star, Finn Wolfhard, plays Richie. As the comedian of the group he adds an amazing layer of eighth grade humor to the movie. He is the definition of “it’s really funny to hear little kids cuss”. Richie is the last in the group to see IT and believe in Pennywise. During a scene in the well house, Richie finds a missing flyer of himself and has a meltdown. We then see a whole different side to the character and know that Richie is not just there for comedic entertainment.

Richie’s best-friend, Eddie (Jack Dylan Grazer), is also quick-witted but major germaphobe. Eddie’s mother (who is a major hypochondriac) tries to keep Eddie “safe” throughout the film, and at one point Eddie has to face a fear of going against his mother’s wishes. Eddie’s main fear, though is a man that is a walking disease. His grotesque and almost zombie like figure would make any person just a tad bit uneasy.

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Now we have Mike (Chosen Jacobs), who has one of the darker background stories of the film. Mike’s parents, in the film, died in a house fire. Mike tells the rest of the group what happened and gives some pretty intense details that makes the most seasoned horror vet quake in their boots. Mike could be considered the resourceful one in the group who is the one who gets rid of Henry Bowers by pushing him down into the well house. He also becomes a key player in the second part of the film.

Next to last we have Stan (Wyatt Oleff). Stan is the only religious member of the Losers’ Club, and struggles with being the “pastor’s son.” But in his case the Rabbi’s son. His fear comes from a painting in his dad’s office with a disfigured lady playing the flute. I think we can relate to Stan because we all had that one item or room in our house that we usually stayed away from. Stan also has the hardest time coming to grips with reality and accepting that IT is very real.

Last but definitely the best we have Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard) himself. Bill Skarsgard adds a whole new level of fear and intensity to the character. Tim Curry, the original Pennywise, will always be amazing, but Mr. Curry missed the intense side of the character that Skarsgard brings out in this new iteration. Skarsgard has a bit of Heath Ledger’s Joker in his version of IT that gives him more energy and more violent. Not that these things make him necessarily a better Pennywise but they do give a fresh perspective on the character.

What do you guys think about the film? Good? Bad? Or just a boring remake? Leave us some comments!

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